FTC Staff Issues Privacy Report

The FTC staff released a report today that proposes a new framework for consumer privacy: Protecting Consumer Privacy in an Era of Rapid Change: A Proposed Framework for Business and Policymakers.

In today’s technologically advanced world, data is collected and shared at lightning speed, often leaving consumers confused, or worse, completely unaware of what’s happening with their personal information.  Why is that?  Partly because privacy polices tend to be too long or too complicated for consumers to understand.

After more than 40 years of enforcing privacy law, we’re proposing three main approaches to enhance consumer privacy:

  • Companies should build privacy protections into their everyday practices
  • Companies should simplify privacy choices for consumers.  In the context of online behavioral advertising, consumers should be able to make choices about third party tracking through a universal “Do Not Track” mechanism, rather than having to make choices on a company-by-company basis.
  • Companies should improve the transparency of their privacy practices by creating clearer, shorter privacy notices and providing consumers with reasonable access to relevant information that companies collect about them. 

We’re committed to working with Congress and other stakeholders to refine and implement our policy recommendations in the coming months.  We’d like your input, too.  The deadline for filing comments is January 31, 2011, and we expect to release a final report next year.

0 Comments

| Comment Policy

Leave A Comment

Don't use this blog to report fraud or deceptive practices. To file a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission, please use the FTC Complaint Assistant.

PRIVACY ACT STATEMENT: It is your choice whether to submit a comment. If you do, you must create a user name, or we will not post your comment. The Federal Trade Commission Act and the Federal Information Security Management Act authorize this information collection for purposes of managing online comments. Comments and user names are part of our public records system, and user names are also part of our computer user records system. We may routinely use these records as described in our Privacy Act system notices. For more information on how we handle information that we collect, please read our privacy policy.