Get FTC news and updates your way

Last week, Facebook announced new video calling and group chat services for the social network. That same afternoon, the President of the United States held a town hall on Twitter to talk about the economy and jobs in America. Today, people have many methods to communicate, often right at the tips of their fingers.  That’s why the FTC has introduced a new STAY CONNECTED feature on ftc.gov.

We understand business owners and attorneys may not always have time to review the latest on our agency’s website. But you still want to stay on top of requirements for legal compliance and pass on important information to clients and customers.  So we want to make it easy for professionals to find, use and share our resources.

What will you find in the STAY CONNECTED feature? Check out our new social media page for news, changes to rules, requests for public comments, workshops, tips, speeches and more on Facebook, YouTube and Twitter.  Maybe you prefer an email when we update our blogs or send out press releases or newsletters. We’ve got all those options on our enhanced subscriptions page. Whether you like your news in 140 characters, in an email or even through RSS, we have it for you, and you can find it all on the STAY CONNECTED box on the FTC homepage. We even have many of these resources available in Spanish at www.ftc.gov/espanol.

If you have any questions about how the FTC uses social media to stay in touch with the public, let us know at socialmedia@ftc.gov.

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