Clothes encounters of the thread kind

OK, OK. We can hear your groans through the speakers. But if you’re in the textile or apparel industry, you’ll want to know that the FTC is asking for public comment on the future of the Wool Products Labeling Rules.

Under the Rules, labels on wool products have to disclose the manufacturer’s or marketer’s name, the country where the product was processed or manufactured, and information about the fiber content. The Rules have been around in some form since 1941 and were updated most recently in 2000. Industry insiders are also aware of the 2006 Wool Suit Fabric Labeling Fairness and International Standards Conforming Act, which sets the maximum average fiber diameter for certain wool products. (We tried to see if that spells out anything, but WSFLFAISCA doesn’t roll off the tongue.)

As part of its ongoing Regulatory Review project, the FTC wants to hear from you about the costs and benefits of the Wool Rules and whether it should clarify or change certain provisions. The agency is also asking for input on how it should modify the Rules to implement the 2006 law.

Save time by filing your comments online by the March 26, 2012, deadline. Tweed like to hear from you by then. (Sorry.)

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WE SHOULD DEFINITELY KEEP ALL THE RULES, THAT IS WHAT KEEPS EVERYTHING AND EVERYONE IN AN ORGANIZED FASHION

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