April 2012

Payday dismay

Take the case of one person who borrowed money from a payday loan operation the FTC has taken to court for allegedly illegal practices.  According to the FTC, the consumer was told that a $500 loan would cost him $650 to repay.  But by slicing and dicing repayments in a way that generated undisclosed fees, the defendants allegedly tried to charge him $1,925 to pay off the $500 loan — and threatened him with arrest when he balked.

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Do Not Call Compliance: Don't take it for granted

www.donotcall.govThere are lots of good reasons for businesses to comply with the National Do Not Call Registry:  It ensures your marketing message will be heard by a more receptive audience and it protects your company from the ire of consumers who don’t want to be disturbed.  But in a case involving calls pitching "free" government grants, a federal judge in Rochester, New York, just added 30 million more reasons not to call people o

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Lawsuits of mass reduction?

The FTC has filed another action against defendants who allegedly attempted to squeeze the last drop from homeowners already under water.  This case, however, involves a disturbing new variation on foreclosure "rescue" operations.

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