Old ploy network

Coleadium, Inc.  The corporate name sounds like tropical foliage or a precious metal on the Periodic Table of Elements.  But the moniker more familiar in the world of affiliate marketing networks — Ads4Dough — puts the FTC’s law enforcement action into perspective.

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Life in the (Medi)fast lane

If you use consumer testimonials in your ads or have clients  who do, check out the FTC’s settlement with Jason Pharmaceuticals, a subsidiary of the diet company, Medifast, Inc.  But to really explore what the case is about, we’ll need to take a trip back to 1992.  (Sorry -- we should have asked our UK consumer protection counterparts to let us borrow the TARDIS for this.)

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Shock to the "system"

There are lots of good reasons for infomercial marketers and other retailers to abide by truth-in-advertising principles.  But for people who insist on a dollars-and-cents rationale, the Court-ordered $478 million price tag for violations related to national ads for money-making systems makes legal compliance look like a bargain.

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New FTC publication for mobile app developers

Are you in the mobile app business?  If so, you’re probably considering some important questions, like what to tell users about your app, what information to collect from users, and what to do with any information you collect.  Whether you work for a tech giant or are striking out on your own with that gotta-have-it app, the same truth-in-advertising standards and basic privacy principles apply.

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Make your claims crystal clear

Earlier this year, the FTC settled five law enforcement actions against companies making allegedly deceptive energy savings claims for their replacement windows.  Now the FTC has sent letters to 14 window manufacturers and one window glass manufacturer, warning that they may be making unsupported energy savings representations for their products.

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