What businesses can do to support the troops on Veterans Day

You might do business with members of the military community — or they could be your employees, neighbors, family and friends.  On this Veterans Day, you may be considering a donation to a charity that assists veterans, active-duty personnel, or military families.  But not all “charities” are legitimate:  Some are sham operators whose only purpose is to make money for themselves.  Others use paid fundraisers whose fees eat up most of a donation, so very little of it is shared with those in need.

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COPPA: All skidding aside

It billed itself as “Facebook and Myspace for kids,” but according to a settlement with the FTC, the Skid-e-Kids website failed to meet critical compliance obligations under COPPA, the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act.  As a result, the FTC says the site collected personal information from about 5,600 kids without their parents’ consent.

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Flash in the pan?

Businesses have wised up that their customers are concerned about privacy. That’s why privacy promises, like any other claim you convey, have to be truthful. So when you describe how you use — and don’t use — people’s information, be sure to give them the straight story, avoiding steps that would undermine their privacy choices. That’s the nuts-and-bolts conclusion companies should draw from the FTC’s settlement with ScanScout, the first agency action addressing Flash cookies.

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CSI: B2B

Most marketers follow FTC happenings to get the latest on legal compliance. But while you’re visiting the Business Center, check out what BCP is doing to protect small businesses in their role as consumers. Getting the inside scoop on how B2B scams work will help you shield your company from fraudsters in the future.

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The eyes of textiles

The FTC’s 100th birthday is looming (and it doesn’t look a day over 85, if we do say so ourselves).  Ever wonder what the FTC’s very first published law enforcement action — 1 F.T.C. 1 — involved?  It dealt with a company that sold thread deceptively labeled as “cilk.”  Fast forward a century and people still want to know for certain that the cotton shirt they’re buying is made of cotton.

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