Time for a gut check?

Like the swallows returning to Capistrano and the umpire yelling “Play ball!” on Opening Day, there’s another inevitable harbinger of spring:  ads for bogus products promising easy weight loss just in time for bathing suit season.  But this year, media outlets have a new tool for spotting false claims before they’re published or aired – and before consumers risk their money (and maybe even their health) on a worthless pill, potion, belt, cream, or whatever.  If you or your clients run ads for weight loss products, it’s time for a gut check.

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New COPPA FAQs can help schools make the grade

In a lot of schools, kids are more likely to be looking at screens than at blackboards.  One advantage:  fewer annoying chalk squeaks.  Of course, the benefits of the connected classroom go far beyond that.  But educators, administrators, and parents have been asking an important question:  How do the protections of the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) and the accompanying FTC rule apply in the school setting?

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Checking up on consumer generated health information

Whether it’s a website where people diagnosed with the same medical condition can share their stories or an app to find out how long it will take in the gym to burn off a Macadamia Mania Ripple sundae, consumers are taking their health in their own hands – and generating a massive amount of digital data in the process.  If you or your clients have jumped into this burgeoning market, here’s a development you’ll want to follow.

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What would your employees do?

The Business Blog reflects sources some might describe as, well, eclectic – everything from Supreme Court jurisprudence to 80s TV.  But today’s post comes from a message on a neighborhood listerv in Washington, D.C.  It starts with a scam, but ends on a note that should be of interest to retailers.

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Cram doesn't pay

Cramming unauthorized charges onto phone bills violates the FTC Act, of course.  But depending on the circumstances, cases like that also can result in criminal prosecution.  Two brothers who bilked consumers out of millions as part of a cramming scam are now behind bars – giving a whole new meaning to the term “cell phone.”  And the prosecutors who brought the case, Assistant United States Attorneys Hallie Mitchell Hoffman and Kyle F.

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